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The European Commission has confirmed a €3.7m investment for a new programme in physics and biomedicine. 14 scientists are set to study healthy ageing under the microscope. They will be developing new optical procedures to study the liver with high-resolution microscopy. The aim is to find out how medical drugs affect the liver and how the organ changes with ageing. The project DeLIVER, co-ordinated by Bielefeld University, Germany, will start in January 2018. The scientists will be carrying out research for their doctorates at six European partner universities and at companies in a total of nine countries. Dr Thomas Huser from Bielefeld University’s Faculty of Physics, said: “In the new project, researchers from physics and biomedicine are co-ordinating their analyses and their advances and jointly addressing healthy ageing – one of the greatest challenges to society today. It is the close link between the two disciplines that makes this programme special.” Huser’s research group ‘Biomolecular Photonics’ is developing high-resolution microscopes that can make structures in body cells visible and accessible to research that traditional optical microscopes are unable to show. He added: “DeLIVER offers young doctoral students an opportunity to work together with experienced scientists and to use advanced technology and the most modern methods in physics. “This prepares them specifically for both the academic and non-academic labour market.” This is now the seventh Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action (MSCA) at Bielefeld University. The post Project to study healthy ageing appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
A €24.8m Horizon 2020 grant will develop new technologies to ‘ensure that future accelerators are more affordable, reliable, sustainable and better performing’. A new and concise document has outlined the importance of particle accelerators in fields such as energy, industry and healthcare. It was conceived and edited by the University of Huddersfield, UK’s, Professor Rob Edgecock and is one of the key outcomes of a four-year, EU-funded project which aimed to ensure that European accelerator facilities lead the world. Edgecock is a member of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications (IIAA) based at Huddersfield, where it operates the Medium Energy Ion Scattering facility (MEIS). The University was one of 40 European partners in the project named EuCARD-2, which involved more than 350 experts and resulted in a large number of innovative ideas for the use of particle accelerators. As co-ordinator of the IIAA of EuCARD2, Edgecock initiated the project to produce a document that would be circulated to Europe’s science policy-makers. Named ‘Particle Accelerators and People’ it has now been produced and distributed. Edgecock said: “One of its aims is to increase awareness of just how important particle accelerators already are, economically, technically and medically within Europe and the rest of the world, because most people simply don’t realise this. “Many will have heard about the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. But they might not know, for example, that if they are receiving radiotherapy then a particle accelerator is involved in that. “So accelerators already have a big impact on day-to-day life, especially in areas like medicine and industry. “But we also want to show that further development is required to improve their performance and the impact they can have in existing application areas, and also to create new applications. “Investment in particle accelerators is important and will have benefits in the future.” The post Report highlights European accelerator research appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
A €24.8m Horizon 2020 grant will develop new technologies to ‘ensure that future accelerators are more affordable, reliable, sustainable and better performing’. A new and concise document has outlined the importance of particle accelerators in fields such as energy, industry and healthcare. It was conceived and edited by the University of Huddersfield, UK’s, Professor Rob Edgecock and is one of the key outcomes of a four-year, EU-funded project which aimed to ensure that European accelerator facilities lead the world. Edgecock is a member of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications (IIAA) based at Huddersfield, where it operates the Medium Energy Ion Scattering facility (MEIS). The University was one of 40 European partners in the project named EuCARD-2, which involved more than 350 experts and resulted in a large number of innovative ideas for the use of particle accelerators. As co-ordinator of the IIAA of EuCARD2, Edgecock initiated the project to produce a document that would be circulated to Europe’s science policy-makers. Named ‘Particle Accelerators and People’ it has now been produced and distributed. Edgecock said: “One of its aims is to increase awareness of just how important particle accelerators already are, economically, technically and medically within Europe and the rest of the world, because most people simply don’t realise this. “Many will have heard about the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. But they might not know, for example, that if they are receiving radiotherapy then a particle accelerator is involved in that. “So accelerators already have a big impact on day-to-day life, especially in areas like medicine and industry. “But we also want to show that further development is required to improve their performance and the impact they can have in existing application areas, and also to create new applications. “Investment in particle accelerators is important and will have benefits in the future.” The post Report highlights European accelerator research appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
A new European exascale computing project, known as EuroEXA, has launched at the Barcelona Supercomputer Center, Spain, this week. EuroEXA is the latest in a series of exascale investments under the Horizon 2020 programme, which will contribute €20m to the project over the next three and a half years. This €20m will include research and development (R&D) for exascale system software, server hardware, networking, storage, cooling and datacentre technologies. The project partners include users who will bring their expertise in high performance computing (HPC) applications areas such climate and weather, physics, and life sciences The initial EuroEXA funding will be spread across the 16 participating members, which span HPC centres, vendors, and user organisations in eight countries. The largest recipient of the EU funding will go to the University of Manchester, UK, which is one of the UK’s leading institutions involved in cutting-edge supercomputing. John Goodacre, Professor of Computer Architectures at the University of Manchester, said: “To deliver the demands of next generation computing and exascale HPC, it is not possible to simply optimise the components of the existing platform. “In EuroEXA, we have taken a holistic approach to break-down the inefficiencies of the historic abstractions and bring significant innovation and co-design across the entire computing stack.” The project will develop HPC-capable ARM and Xilinx FPGA designs, which will be incorporated into an operational prototype by 2020, along with new memory and cooling technologies. The hope is that this will be the basis of a European exascale system to be deployed in the 2022-2023 timeframe. The post Exascale computing project receives funding appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
A new European exascale computing project, known as EuroEXA, has launched at the Barcelona Supercomputer Center, Spain, this week. EuroEXA is the latest in a series of exascale investments under the Horizon 2020 programme, which will contribute €20m to the project over the next three and a half years. This €20m will include research and development (R&D) for exascale system software, server hardware, networking, storage, cooling and datacentre technologies. The project partners include users who will bring their expertise in high performance computing (HPC) applications areas such climate and weather, physics, and life sciences The initial EuroEXA funding will be spread across the 16 participating members, which span HPC centres, vendors, and user organisations in eight countries. The largest recipient of the EU funding will go to the University of Manchester, UK, which is one of the UK’s leading institutions involved in cutting-edge supercomputing. John Goodacre, Professor of Computer Architectures at the University of Manchester, said: “To deliver the demands of next generation computing and exascale HPC, it is not possible to simply optimise the components of the existing platform. “In EuroEXA, we have taken a holistic approach to break-down the inefficiencies of the historic abstractions and bring significant innovation and co-design across the entire computing stack.” The project will develop HPC-capable ARM and Xilinx FPGA designs, which will be incorporated into an operational prototype by 2020, along with new memory and cooling technologies. The hope is that this will be the basis of a European exascale system to be deployed in the 2022-2023 timeframe. The post Exascale computing project receives funding appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. a developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, has announced that its Phase III study of PLX-PAD cells to support recovery following surgery for femoral neck fracture has been awarded an €7.4m. This marks the second grant awarded to a Pluristem Phase III trial under the Horizon 2020 programme, following a €7.6m award for its ongoing Phase III study of PLX-PAD cells in the treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI), which was awarded in August 2016. The Phase III trial of PLX-PAD cells in the treatment of femoral neck fracture will be a collaborative effort between Pluristem and an international consortium led by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, under the leadership of Dr Tobias Winkler, Principal Investigator at the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Julius Wolff Institute, Germany, and Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, US. The trial demonstrated that patients treated with Pluristem’s PLX-PAD cells during total hip arthroplasty experienced significant muscle regeneration compared to the control group with an improvement in muscle force and in muscle volume six months after surgery. Winklers said: “Following the impressive results from the Phase I/II study of PLX-PAD cells in a similar orthopedic indication, we are excited to advance PLX-PAD cell therapy into a Phase III study to aid in muscle regeneration in patients recovering from femoral neck fracture. If similar results are achieved in this Phase III trial, it could show that PLX-PAD cells can improve outcomes in these procedures and change the way recovery is managed worldwide.” Pluristem plans to enrol patients at clinical sites throughout Europe and the US. The study is expected to serve as a pivotal trial for regulatory approval in both regions. The post Project to support femoral neck fracture trial appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
Pluristem Therapeutics Inc. a developer of placenta-based cell therapy products, has announced that its Phase III study of PLX-PAD cells to support recovery following surgery for femoral neck fracture has been awarded an €7.4m. This marks the second grant awarded to a Pluristem Phase III trial under the Horizon 2020 programme, following a €7.6m award for its ongoing Phase III study of PLX-PAD cells in the treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI), which was awarded in August 2016. The Phase III trial of PLX-PAD cells in the treatment of femoral neck fracture will be a collaborative effort between Pluristem and an international consortium led by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, under the leadership of Dr Tobias Winkler, Principal Investigator at the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Julius Wolff Institute, Germany, and Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, US. The trial demonstrated that patients treated with Pluristem’s PLX-PAD cells during total hip arthroplasty experienced significant muscle regeneration compared to the control group with an improvement in muscle force and in muscle volume six months after surgery. Winklers said: “Following the impressive results from the Phase I/II study of PLX-PAD cells in a similar orthopedic indication, we are excited to advance PLX-PAD cell therapy into a Phase III study to aid in muscle regeneration in patients recovering from femoral neck fracture. If similar results are achieved in this Phase III trial, it could show that PLX-PAD cells can improve outcomes in these procedures and change the way recovery is managed worldwide.” Pluristem plans to enrol patients at clinical sites throughout Europe and the US. The study is expected to serve as a pivotal trial for regulatory approval in both regions. The post Project to support femoral neck fracture trial appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
Researchers at the University of Bradford, UK, are joining with the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Aarhus University, Denmark to develop smart technologies for nine European cities. The five-year Smart Cities and Open Data Re-use (SCORE) project aims to improve the delivery of public services with applications such as interactive bins that can sense when they are full, intelligent car parks that can highlight empty spaces, and real-time flood-warning information data. These ideas will be trialled and potentially implemented in cities across Europe, including; Aarhus, Amsterdam, Aberdeen, Bergen, Bradford, Dordrecht, Ghent, Gothenberg and Hamburg. Dr Dhaval Thakker, SCORE project principal investigator at the University of Bradford, said: “The aim of the project is to improve the delivery of public services, using innovative software and data-sharing. “Our role is to use our expertise in creating IoT inspired solutions, to assist cities in developing new, and more efficient ways of delivering essential services.” As part of the project, the SCORE partners will define 12 shared challenges to improve municipal services, covering services such as the environment, water, parking and sustainable transport. They will then be tested in living labs with the data and insights generated shared across all partners, helping them to implement these solutions. All cities taking part are targeting a 10% reduction in the cost of service provision and a 20% improvement in the quality of these services, as measured by public perception. It is hoped that the smart cities taking part in the SCORE project could save up to €50m by 2021. Funded through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the SCORE project embraces an ‘open-source’ approach, where information, data and innovation are shared across all partners. The post European universities collaborate for smart cities appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
Researchers at the University of Bradford, UK, are joining with the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Aarhus University, Denmark to develop smart technologies for nine European cities. The five-year Smart Cities and Open Data Re-use (SCORE) project aims to improve the delivery of public services with applications such as interactive bins that can sense when they are full, intelligent car parks that can highlight empty spaces, and real-time flood-warning information data. These ideas will be trialled and potentially implemented in cities across Europe, including; Aarhus, Amsterdam, Aberdeen, Bergen, Bradford, Dordrecht, Ghent, Gothenberg and Hamburg. Dr Dhaval Thakker, SCORE project principal investigator at the University of Bradford, said: “The aim of the project is to improve the delivery of public services, using innovative software and data-sharing. “Our role is to use our expertise in creating IoT inspired solutions, to assist cities in developing new, and more efficient ways of delivering essential services.” As part of the project, the SCORE partners will define 12 shared challenges to improve municipal services, covering services such as the environment, water, parking and sustainable transport. They will then be tested in living labs with the data and insights generated shared across all partners, helping them to implement these solutions. All cities taking part are targeting a 10% reduction in the cost of service provision and a 20% improvement in the quality of these services, as measured by public perception. It is hoped that the smart cities taking part in the SCORE project could save up to €50m by 2021. Funded through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the SCORE project embraces an ‘open-source’ approach, where information, data and innovation are shared across all partners. The post European universities collaborate for smart cities appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.
Two wind turbines in the Pentland Firth, Scotland, have set a new world record for a month’s production of renewable electricity from tidal power. Atlantis Resources announced yesterday (31 August) that their two turbines had produced 700MW hours of electricity in August – a world record and enough to power 2,000 homes. In total, the turbines have now produced 2GW hours of electricity since their launch earlier this year. Atlantis also confirmed that a third turbine was reinstalled at the MeyGen site in recent days. It gives hope that Atlantis will soon go on to complete Phase 1A of their £50m (~€54m) MeyGen project in its entirety, with four turbines producing 6MW of electricity possibly by the end of October. All three turbines already in place had been recovered from the sea earlier this year for improvements to be made, and all three have been put back in the Pentland Firth and reconnected to the National Grid. The group said the fourth and final Phase 1A turbine had experienced some minor delays in receiving upgrade components and was now expected to be reinstalled during the next neap tide in late September. Director of project delivery at MeyGen David Taaffe said: “The production performance from the installed turbines on the MeyGen project has been very good. “August proved to be a world record month, providing enough energy to power 2,000 Scottish homes from just two turbines. “With yet another successful installation campaign expertly completed this week by the Atlantis operations team, we expect to continue to break records throughout the rest of the year generating both predictable power and revenue.” The next phase of the MeyGen project has already secured a further €20m under the Horizon 2020 project as well as €17m from the NER300 project, which funds innovation in low-carbon energy production. The post Turbines set world record for monthly power appeared first on Horizon 2020 Projects.

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